Pinot Noir Grape

Different wine-making techniques and different wine makers can create wines of widely varying styles from this grape. Therefore the profile provided is generic and represents the characteristics of the grape and not necessarily every wine made from it. Similarly, the food pairings provided are general and assume the typical style of wine traditionally made from this grape.
Food PairingsMeats & Seafood: Poached, grilled, fried, baked or roasted fish, crustacean shell fish, beef, pork or fowl.
Sauce: Au jus, white, savory, herb
Cheese: Soft or hard goat cheese, medium cow and sheep cheese
Other: Mushrooms

Grape ProfileThe tremendously broad range of bouquets, flavors, textures and impressions that Pinot noir can produce sometimes confuses tasters. In the broadest terms, the wine tends to be of light to medium body with an aroma reminiscent of black cherry, raspberry or currant. Traditional red Burgundy is famous for its fleshy, farmyard/earthy aromas, but new clones have favoured a lighter, fruitier style. The grape's color when young, often compared to that of garnet, is often much lighter than that of other red wines. However, an emerging style from central California and New Zealand highlights a more powerful, fruit forward and darker wine that can approach syrah in depth. Pinot Noir is also used in the production of Champagne, usually with Chardonnay and Pinot meunier. Pinot Noir wines exhibit earthy, bing cherry, strawberry, raspberry, ripe tomato, rose pedal, spice, rosemary, cinnamon, caraway, peppermint, oregano, green tea, black olive, plum and rhubarb notes. Notes of mushroom, earth, leather, meat, and truffle. Oak provides vanilla, coconut, smoke, cedar, toast and tar.